Monthly Archives: March 2015

Dealing with abandonment of goods

Property Management: Dealing with the abandonment of goods

In New Zealand – if a tenant leaves behind some of their possessions after moving out, there are procedures which must be followed.  Your property manager will take care of this for you, but you may be interested to know your responsibilities as a landlord when dealing with the abandonment of goods.

Any perishable goods, such as food, may be disposed of immediately. For non-perishable items there is a choice of procedures to follow before you are able to throw away the goods.

First you must make a reasonable attempt to contact the tenant to arrange collection of the abandoned goods.  Any personal documents left behind by the tenant must be stored securely. If unclaimed after 35 days they may remain in storage or be handed to the police.

If other goods remain uncollected, you may choose to either:
1. Apply to the Tenancy Tribunal for an order for the disposal of the goods. The Tribunal may direct that the landlord to return the goods to the tenant; or if that is not practicable, order that the goods be sold or disposed of.
2. Dispose of abandoned goods following assessment of market value. If the value of the goods is less than the cost of storing, transporting and selling them, the landlord can immediately dispose of them as they see fit.

If the value of the goods is more than the cost of storing, transporting and selling them, the landlord must secure the goods in safe storage for at least 35 days, after which they must either continue to store them to await any claims to the goods by the tenant or sell the goods at a reasonable market price.

The tenant can claim stored goods at any time prior to disposal, on payment of reasonable storage and disposal costs.  If the landlord has sold the goods, he or she may
apply to the Tribunal for an order specifying the amount (if any) owed to them out of the proceeds of sale.  The remaining money must be paid to the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. The tenant can then apply for the payment of the proceeds of sale in the Residential Tenancies Trust Account within one year of the date of sale.

 


Our team would be glad to tell you more about our property management services in your area.

 

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Yes, you can sell a home on a busy road

Neighbourhoods can change dramatically over time, and the suburban street that was so quiet when you bought your home may now be much busier – and noisier – but that doesn’t mean that no-one will buy the property.

“In fact,” says Richard Gray, CEO of Harcourts Real Estate, “there are buyers who may even consider the busy road an advantage, depending on what they intend to do with the property. To some it may spell more visibility for a home-based business or professional practice, for example.

“And there are others who may not even be concerned about the busy road as long as the property is close to shops, schools, public transport and sports venues. There are many young buyers these days who see some traffic noise as a fair trade-off for easy access to the facilities they need.”

However, he says, even if you don’t come across such buyers, there are several ways to make your home more appealing and ensure a sale. “From a noise perspective, a concrete or brick wall between your home and the road is more effective than a palisade fence, and you may want to consider putting one up.”

Gray says other possibilities include creating an entertainment or relaxation area in the part of your garden that is furthest from the road, and installing double-glazing along the face of the house closest to the road.

“But before you go to the expense of doing any of these things, you must know that in all home sales, the factor that has the most pulling power for buyers is the price, so you need to sit down with your agent and set a realistic price in the context of other recent sales in your area, and along the same road.”

He notes that a properly trained and professional agent will not try to suggest that you “test the market” at an unrealistic price level, or conceal from you the fact that your home might sell for less than other properties in the area that are similar but located on quieter streets.

“On the other hand, though, an experienced agent will know how to market your home most effectively by maximising its good features and targeting the most likely buyers. A careful choice of agent is thus the real key to selling a home on a busy road.”

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Yes, you can sell a home on a busy road

Neighbourhoods can change dramatically over time, and the suburban street that was so quiet when you bought your home may now be much busier – and noisier – but that doesn’t mean that no-one will buy the property.

“In fact,” says Richard Gray, CEO of Harcourts Real Estate, “there are buyers who may even consider the busy road an advantage, depending on what they intend to do with the property. To some it may spell more visibility for a home-based business or professional practice, for example.

“And there are others who may not even be concerned about the busy road as long as the property is close to shops, schools, public transport and sports venues. There are many young buyers these days who see some traffic noise as a fair trade-off for easy access to the facilities they need.”

However, he says, even if you don’t come across such buyers, there are several ways to make your home more appealing and ensure a sale. “From a noise perspective, a concrete or brick wall between your home and the road is more effective than a palisade fence, and you may want to consider putting one up.”

Gray says other possibilities include creating an entertainment or relaxation area in the part of your garden that is furthest from the road, and installing double-glazing along the face of the house closest to the road.

“But before you go to the expense of doing any of these things, you must know that in all home sales, the factor that has the most pulling power for buyers is the price, so you need to sit down with your agent and set a realistic price in the context of other recent sales in your area, and along the same road.”

He notes that a properly trained and professional agent will not try to suggest that you “test the market” at an unrealistic price level, or conceal from you the fact that your home might sell for less than other properties in the area that are similar but located on quieter streets.

“On the other hand, though, an experienced agent will know how to market your home most effectively by maximising its good features and targeting the most likely buyers. A careful choice of agent is thus the real key to selling a home on a busy road.”


Yes, you can sell a home on a busy road

Neighbourhoods can change dramatically over time, and the suburban street that was so quiet when you bought your home may now be much busier – and noisier – but that doesn’t mean that no-one will buy the property.

“In fact,” says Richard Gray, CEO of Harcourts Real Estate, “there are buyers who may even consider the busy road an advantage, depending on what they intend to do with the property. To some it may spell more visibility for a home-based business or professional practice, for example.

“And there are others who may not even be concerned about the busy road as long as the property is close to shops, schools, public transport and sports venues. There are many young buyers these days who see some traffic noise as a fair trade-off for easy access to the facilities they need.”

However, he says, even if you don’t come across such buyers, there are several ways to make your home more appealing and ensure a sale. “From a noise perspective, a concrete or brick wall between your home and the road is more effective than a palisade fence, and you may want to consider putting one up.”

Gray says other possibilities include creating an entertainment or relaxation area in the part of your garden that is furthest from the road, and installing double-glazing along the face of the house closest to the road.

“But before you go to the expense of doing any of these things, you must know that in all home sales, the factor that has the most pulling power for buyers is the price, so you need to sit down with your agent and set a realistic price in the context of other recent sales in your area, and along the same road.”

He notes that a properly trained and professional agent will not try to suggest that you “test the market” at an unrealistic price level, or conceal from you the fact that your home might sell for less than other properties in the area that are similar but located on quieter streets.

“On the other hand, though, an experienced agent will know how to market your home most effectively by maximising its good features and targeting the most likely buyers. A careful choice of agent is thus the real key to selling a home on a busy road.”


Yes, you can sell a home on a busy road

Neighbourhoods can change dramatically over time, and the suburban street that was so quiet when you bought your home may now be much busier – and noisier – but that doesn’t mean that no-one will buy the property.

“In fact,” says Richard Gray, CEO of Harcourts Real Estate, “there are buyers who may even consider the busy road an advantage, depending on what they intend to do with the property. To some it may spell more visibility for a home-based business or professional practice, for example.

“And there are others who may not even be concerned about the busy road as long as the property is close to shops, schools, public transport and sports venues. There are many young buyers these days who see some traffic noise as a fair trade-off for easy access to the facilities they need.”

However, he says, even if you don’t come across such buyers, there are several ways to make your home more appealing and ensure a sale. “From a noise perspective, a concrete or brick wall between your home and the road is more effective than a palisade fence, and you may want to consider putting one up.”

Gray says other possibilities include creating an entertainment or relaxation area in the part of your garden that is furthest from the road, and installing double-glazing along the face of the house closest to the road.

“But before you go to the expense of doing any of these things, you must know that in all home sales, the factor that has the most pulling power for buyers is the price, so you need to sit down with your agent and set a realistic price in the context of other recent sales in your area, and along the same road.”

He notes that a properly trained and professional agent will not try to suggest that you “test the market” at an unrealistic price level, or conceal from you the fact that your home might sell for less than other properties in the area that are similar but located on quieter streets.

“On the other hand, though, an experienced agent will know how to market your home most effectively by maximising its good features and targeting the most likely buyers. A careful choice of agent is thus the real key to selling a home on a busy road.”