Tag Archives: Press Release

The Harcourts Foundation achieves three million dollar milestone

Harcourts Foundation logo

The charitable arm of Harcourts real estate group, The Harcourts Foundation has surpassed $3 million in funds raised to support local non-profit community groups across the country and internationally.

The Harcourts Foundation was established by Harcourts in 2008. The foundation operates as a charity 100 per cent, with all funds raised going directly to non-profit organisations.

The Foundation is funded through Harcourts employees’ salary sacrifice, ‘off the top’ contributions from commissions and organised fundraisers.

There are currently more than 264 of Harcourts global offices participating in the Harcourts Foundation programme, donating a percentage of every property sale.

Harcourts Managing Director Mike Green says that in just a short time the Harcourts Foundation has touched the lives of thousands of people throughout Australia, and across the globe.

“Internationally, the Harcourts Foundation has made more than 500 grants to community groups, helping with everything from supporting programmes for women affected by violence, at-risk youth, children with disabilities and to help make communities safer.

“Our Harcourts businesses are wholly committed to making a positive difference to the communities where they operate and we’re incredibly proud of the work The Harcourts Foundation is doing,” says Mr Green.

Harcourts employees including a National Board of Directors, Coordinator, Accountant and Regional Ambassadors all donate their time and expertise to oversee and administer The Harcourts Foundation.

This year, The Harcourts Foundation will once again partner with White Ribbon Australia to support the charity’s Breaking the Silence schools campaign, which supports principals and teachers to embed models of respectful relationships in school culture. The programme aims to prevent the perpetration of violence against women and girls.

To support White Ribbon’s cause, Harcourts offices across the country will take part in the Walk a Mile in Their Shoes event being held in each state. The walk encourages both men and women to don a pair of heels and walk a mile in a show of solidarity for those affected by violence against women.

Visit mycause.com.au/events/walkamileintheirshoes to find out more about the event, including how to support and participate.

For more information about The Harcourts Foundation, including information on individual grants made and the grant application process, visit harcourtsfoundation.org.


Yes, you can sell a home on a busy road

Neighbourhoods can change dramatically over time, and the suburban street that was so quiet when you bought your home may now be much busier – and noisier – but that doesn’t mean that no-one will buy the property.

“In fact,” says Richard Gray, CEO of Harcourts Real Estate, “there are buyers who may even consider the busy road an advantage, depending on what they intend to do with the property. To some it may spell more visibility for a home-based business or professional practice, for example.

“And there are others who may not even be concerned about the busy road as long as the property is close to shops, schools, public transport and sports venues. There are many young buyers these days who see some traffic noise as a fair trade-off for easy access to the facilities they need.”

However, he says, even if you don’t come across such buyers, there are several ways to make your home more appealing and ensure a sale. “From a noise perspective, a concrete or brick wall between your home and the road is more effective than a palisade fence, and you may want to consider putting one up.”

Gray says other possibilities include creating an entertainment or relaxation area in the part of your garden that is furthest from the road, and installing double-glazing along the face of the house closest to the road.

“But before you go to the expense of doing any of these things, you must know that in all home sales, the factor that has the most pulling power for buyers is the price, so you need to sit down with your agent and set a realistic price in the context of other recent sales in your area, and along the same road.”

He notes that a properly trained and professional agent will not try to suggest that you “test the market” at an unrealistic price level, or conceal from you the fact that your home might sell for less than other properties in the area that are similar but located on quieter streets.

“On the other hand, though, an experienced agent will know how to market your home most effectively by maximising its good features and targeting the most likely buyers. A careful choice of agent is thus the real key to selling a home on a busy road.”


Yes, you can sell a home on a busy road

Neighbourhoods can change dramatically over time, and the suburban street that was so quiet when you bought your home may now be much busier – and noisier – but that doesn’t mean that no-one will buy the property.

“In fact,” says Richard Gray, CEO of Harcourts Real Estate, “there are buyers who may even consider the busy road an advantage, depending on what they intend to do with the property. To some it may spell more visibility for a home-based business or professional practice, for example.

“And there are others who may not even be concerned about the busy road as long as the property is close to shops, schools, public transport and sports venues. There are many young buyers these days who see some traffic noise as a fair trade-off for easy access to the facilities they need.”

However, he says, even if you don’t come across such buyers, there are several ways to make your home more appealing and ensure a sale. “From a noise perspective, a concrete or brick wall between your home and the road is more effective than a palisade fence, and you may want to consider putting one up.”

Gray says other possibilities include creating an entertainment or relaxation area in the part of your garden that is furthest from the road, and installing double-glazing along the face of the house closest to the road.

“But before you go to the expense of doing any of these things, you must know that in all home sales, the factor that has the most pulling power for buyers is the price, so you need to sit down with your agent and set a realistic price in the context of other recent sales in your area, and along the same road.”

He notes that a properly trained and professional agent will not try to suggest that you “test the market” at an unrealistic price level, or conceal from you the fact that your home might sell for less than other properties in the area that are similar but located on quieter streets.

“On the other hand, though, an experienced agent will know how to market your home most effectively by maximising its good features and targeting the most likely buyers. A careful choice of agent is thus the real key to selling a home on a busy road.”


Yes, you can sell a home on a busy road

Neighbourhoods can change dramatically over time, and the suburban street that was so quiet when you bought your home may now be much busier – and noisier – but that doesn’t mean that no-one will buy the property.

“In fact,” says Richard Gray, CEO of Harcourts Real Estate, “there are buyers who may even consider the busy road an advantage, depending on what they intend to do with the property. To some it may spell more visibility for a home-based business or professional practice, for example.

“And there are others who may not even be concerned about the busy road as long as the property is close to shops, schools, public transport and sports venues. There are many young buyers these days who see some traffic noise as a fair trade-off for easy access to the facilities they need.”

However, he says, even if you don’t come across such buyers, there are several ways to make your home more appealing and ensure a sale. “From a noise perspective, a concrete or brick wall between your home and the road is more effective than a palisade fence, and you may want to consider putting one up.”

Gray says other possibilities include creating an entertainment or relaxation area in the part of your garden that is furthest from the road, and installing double-glazing along the face of the house closest to the road.

“But before you go to the expense of doing any of these things, you must know that in all home sales, the factor that has the most pulling power for buyers is the price, so you need to sit down with your agent and set a realistic price in the context of other recent sales in your area, and along the same road.”

He notes that a properly trained and professional agent will not try to suggest that you “test the market” at an unrealistic price level, or conceal from you the fact that your home might sell for less than other properties in the area that are similar but located on quieter streets.

“On the other hand, though, an experienced agent will know how to market your home most effectively by maximising its good features and targeting the most likely buyers. A careful choice of agent is thus the real key to selling a home on a busy road.”


Yes, you can sell a home on a busy road

Neighbourhoods can change dramatically over time, and the suburban street that was so quiet when you bought your home may now be much busier – and noisier – but that doesn’t mean that no-one will buy the property.

“In fact,” says Richard Gray, CEO of Harcourts Real Estate, “there are buyers who may even consider the busy road an advantage, depending on what they intend to do with the property. To some it may spell more visibility for a home-based business or professional practice, for example.

“And there are others who may not even be concerned about the busy road as long as the property is close to shops, schools, public transport and sports venues. There are many young buyers these days who see some traffic noise as a fair trade-off for easy access to the facilities they need.”

However, he says, even if you don’t come across such buyers, there are several ways to make your home more appealing and ensure a sale. “From a noise perspective, a concrete or brick wall between your home and the road is more effective than a palisade fence, and you may want to consider putting one up.”

Gray says other possibilities include creating an entertainment or relaxation area in the part of your garden that is furthest from the road, and installing double-glazing along the face of the house closest to the road.

“But before you go to the expense of doing any of these things, you must know that in all home sales, the factor that has the most pulling power for buyers is the price, so you need to sit down with your agent and set a realistic price in the context of other recent sales in your area, and along the same road.”

He notes that a properly trained and professional agent will not try to suggest that you “test the market” at an unrealistic price level, or conceal from you the fact that your home might sell for less than other properties in the area that are similar but located on quieter streets.

“On the other hand, though, an experienced agent will know how to market your home most effectively by maximising its good features and targeting the most likely buyers. A careful choice of agent is thus the real key to selling a home on a busy road.”